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Amassed Revelations
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D-Lotus



Joined: 21 Oct 2004
Posts: 4123
Location: Hollywood, USA

Posted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 7:58 pm    Post subject: Amassed Revelations  

Dedications: Valencia, Racing, Jonathan Swift, Heathcliff, American Werewolf in London.

Storygame process: Read the story, and then based on the character's personality, suggest what he/she should do. When all suggestions have been given, the author (me) will post a poll. You must vote for your favorite option on the poll, and based on that decision, the author will write the next chapter as it affects the story.

Chapter 9

"Jeannie, for now, you should probably avoid Andy and stay in the company of other people at all times. Do you have anyplace to stay?"

"Yes, I have a friend, and I'm sure it could mean no inconvenience to her..."

"Well, we'll resolve this issue of 'guardianship' if Andy insists about it. Keep in company of other people so that you won't need to come in conflict with him about anything."

"Yes, Father."

You may feel light, but now I feel heavy with your weight, thought Devine. He had a new clue to the murder. Perhaps it wasn't connected, but Devine had a feeling that it was all interrelated. Yet, he had received a letter from the bishop this morning that prohibited him from continuing. What would he do? Would he exploit this new clue, or stop altogether? Was there anything else he could do?
**

The knocks sounded again, like pale ghosts moaning throughout the church halls. Devine slowly opened his eyes and lighted his bedside lamp, breathing cautiously. He waited for the sounds to return, searching for the familiar rhythm of the knocks, almost like a heartbeat. They did, ever so delicately and melodiously, yet Devine's trained hearing identified them. He grabbed his habit, folded at the foot of the bed, and began to dress over his pajamas. He was fumbling with the long row of buttons, when the knocks faintly sounded again. Biting his lip, Devine simply pulled his coat from the hanger and hurriedly robed himself in it.

He stepped out into the hallway with his oil lamp and immediately shuddered due to the coldness around him. He began to make his way down the corridor, opposite from the sounds of knocking and towards the other rooms. He stopped in front of Turner's room, and the sounds of the furtive stranger who knocked on the church's door were dim. Turner's own door was closed, and when Devine reached a trembling hand towards it, he found it locked.

Continuing across the passageway, Devine passed a soundly-sleeping Dole, pleasantly snoring. He turned his head in his dreams and allowed Devine to glimpse his face by the moonlight, shining on him through the window. His round, happy face appeared silvery and angel-like. The knockings grew hushed and then inuadible, but Devine still walked forward in deliberate, drawn-out steps as his oil lamp infallibly illuminated his path.

Reaching the door to the garden, Devine turned the knob lingeringly, dreading the darkness. He released the door and it unexpectedly swung open against the wall as a sudden lightning bolt crashed, disturbing the calm night. He stepped back in shock before peering outside again. Recovering from the unexpected noise of thunder, he tread outside.

Devine walked through the soft earth of the garden with composure as the fresh night air and the smell of grass surrounded him protectively. He began to hear the stifled knocks spring to life again, drawing closer. His heart pounded as he strode through the garden gate amid it's creaks and groans. He galloped across the west-face of the church, half-running under the wooden shutters that filed behind him. He stopped at the corner of the white-washed walls, stained black by the darkness of the night. Catching his breath as noiselessly as he could, he meticulously laid down his oil-lamp. He peered around just as another combination of knocks echoed softly everywhere, panting and gasping quietly like Devine.

The aging priest discerned an arm and a fist withdrawing from the door, waiting patiently, listening. What was it that visited the church at night, hiding it's soul behind the shadows, prowling and pending like a predator? There was a sad, mellifluous whisper that reminded Devine of a waning flower, and then the figure began to withdraw completely from the doorway.

Devine sprung from the corner, his feet flying from the dirt in a sprint. The figure turned at the sound of Devine's grunting, in time for realization to make it's effect. Devine lunged the last few feet, knowing his advantage had been lost. The figure was completely immersed in shadow, and as Devine traveled through the air in its direction, the fear gripped him that he would travel straight through it. Devine felt an admonitory human chill, and thought that he must be confronting a spirit, an spirit of evil. He would crash through it and impact on the ground, terrified of the tormentor who'd laugh contemptuously at him. The embodiment of sin, eternally scorning him.

Instead, there was a solid and wholesome crash of bodies, and a sharp cry. Their bodies landed, and Devine found himself on top. Overcoming the weariness of old age, he used his advantage to pin the man to the ground. He doubted he could hold the figure there with his meager strength, but the man, as he turned out to be, gave no resistance. He simply lay crumpled on the ground, scared stiff by the flying priest.

"Who are you?" coughed Devine, as he attempted to recover from the collision. The man trembled, speechless. Devine insisted, grabbing him by the collar.

"P-p-patty O'Hara, Pa-a-atty O'Hara." He replied, stuttering in fear.

"What the hell do you want?" Devine said angrily, angry at his own foolishness, angry at mistaking a coward for an evil predator. Thunder crashed again, and a shower of rain poured down from the skies.

And then the man began to cry.
**

Devine brought him in without waking the others. He gave him his coat to wear and sat down with him near the pulpit, on one of the benches. He tried smiling comfortingly, and Patty wiped away his tears.

"Now, tell me, Patty, was it you that came those other nights?"

The man nodded sorrowfully. Devine lay a hand on his shoulder and tried his best not to sound harsh. Under the influence of his heightened nerves, he found it hard not to do.

"Now, Patty, why would you do anything like that?"

"I'm sorry, Father. I'm sorry, I'm sorry." he sobbed.

"I know you are, Patty, I know you are. Now, just answer the questions, can you?"

"I came...I don't know why I came, Father." And he began crying again, hiccupping and sobbing and wiping away his tears with anguish. Devine offered his kerchief. Patty O'Hara blew his nose into it, trying to discharge his emotions through his emission. Devine pulled O'Hara's head back in fear that he would suffocate. The man wiped away any hanging ectoplasm from his ghostly face.

But Patty O'Hara wasn't an unhandsome man. He had round, clear blue eyes, red-rimmed from crying, and collar-length blond hair, and a small blond moustache. He was relatively young and lean faced, with a quirky half-smile. He was built but wasn't brawny, a serious and reflective man, who was perhaps too easily manipulated by the power of words and gravity. He was certainly carried by his emotions, which seemed to have at the moment a rather strong grip on him.

"Did you need help? Did you need to talk to anyone?" coaxed Devine.

"Yes." Patty answered, recomposing himself again.

"Then...why'd you run away every time we came to the door?"

"I was scared." Patty stalled.

"Scared?" laughed Devine, finally succumbing to the mirth of the laughable situation. "Why, we are defenseless old priests!" Devine rubbed his aching back, then realized how incongruous his night-time proceedings had turned out. "I really don't usually attack people in the way I did. I'm really sorry if I scared you."

"That's not why I was scared."

"Why, then?" asked Devine. Patty O'Hara had succeeded in intriguing him. But Patty didn't answer. Instead, he nodded directionally towards somewhere in the church. Devine turned, but could see no-one.

"What is it?" Devine asked inquisitively. But O'Hara was speechless. He slowly and reverently reached up his hand and pointed towards something again. Devine followed the imaginary line Patty's finger was drawing. Staring back at him defiantly, the confession box sat solemnly obscured in the darkness of the darkest corner of the church. Devine trembled with dread as he saw O'Hara contemplating the confession box in awe.

"Do...do you want to confess something?" whispered Devine, his voice quieted by a feeling of grotesque supernatural within the church. O'Hara nodded with his eyes still trained on the confession box.

They both stood up and began walking. There was something misshapen about O'Hara's reverence of the confession box, something bizarre. Devine felt as though he were guiding a man towards a sacrificial temple. The shadows of the church created surreal creatures in his mind, dancing around mockingly. Devine felt as though the essence of redemption were being distorted. He watched O'Hara tremblingly reach for the confession box door, before immersing himself into the darkness of his own compartment.

There was something about the confession box. Whenever Devine sat inside, whether it be night or day, he always subconsciously conjured fantastic memories of what life could be had he chosen a different path. No man is safe from sin. As he sat down opposite the screen which concealed O'Hara, he sensed the old feelings returning.

Devine cleared his voice. "Eh, Patty, what is it that you need to confess?"

There was a dry laugh of self-pity, which sounded like a cough, and then silence. Devine began to feel somewhat nervous. He was going to speak when he was anticipated by O'Hara.

"Father, is God listening?" he asked in a childlike manner. Devine furrowed his brows.

"I would think so." he said, before carefully adding, "God is infinite. And, all you need to do to find God is to search within yourself." O'Hara weighed Devine's words and then sighed contentedly.

"Why do people sin, Father?" the man with the baby eyes asked. Devine thought, then answered patiently.

"Man has often pondered about sin. In ancient Jewish society, they believed disease and insanity were physical manifestations of sin, perhaps as a punishment for God. Of course, Christ exposed this untruth, and modern medicine has complied with his argument." Devine explained, as the memories of yellowing books flashed through his mind. Man's wisdom is contained within literature, he thought.

"Sin has determinedly infiltrated man's intentions since the beginning of times by attaining it's determining victory from Adam's disobedience. In the Bible, sin is anthropomorphized by the serpent, and later on by Satan. Our only basis to determine what is sinful, are the Ten Commandments. But, do ten laws have the capacity to encompass true justice? Perhaps as the base of a pyramid, yes, but not as a peak that delves within every approachable specific." Devine found himself enjoying the argument as he reminisced periods of rapturous scholarship. The memories offered support against his own apple of temptation, against his recurring fantasies of another existence.

"Do you follow me?" he asked.

"Yes." whispered O'Hara, enthralled.

"Eh, where was I? Ah, yes. If there is no appropriate measure of sin, then how can mankind judge it as so? The only understanding of what is sin, comes through Christ. During the last supper, at the doors of departure from the physical world, he indoctrinates his final and foremost lesson. He bids his disciples to obey one commandment beyond any other. It is a new commandment, one that fulfills all others. He proffers- 'Love one another.' His heart and spirit, bursting conviction and earnestness, strive to make his words take hold on his disciples, who have before their eyes the truth, yet neglect to look deepest. Sin. Neglecting to love one another is true sin.

Man is the physical reflection of God, son. He created our existence in His image. God is within our spirit, and God is the truth. The truth, therefore, is within ourselves. The answer to your question, is that man sins because he knows not the truth inside him. Man without the knowledge of Christ's truth and God's truth has a propensity to sin that is natural because of the fallibility of man's unguided physical existence."

"Ah, I think I understand. Is that it? Is that the truth to everything, our spirit?" gasped O'Hara. His soft features gazed through the screen in appreciation.

"As far as I know, son, the men who understand their own spirit are very rare. Jesus Christ was one. Perhaps there were others." mused Devine.

"Father, it isn't sinful to love, then?" O'Hara asked hopefully. Devine was beginning to become slightly annoyed with all of the questions, but he reminded himself of his duty as a spiritual advisor.

"It is sinful to love selfishly. Surely, it is better than not loving at all, but all true love is unconditional." Devine answered. O'Hara sighed, and then fell silent. Devine said nothing, foretelling the confession would emerge soon.

"Father," O'Hara said, his voice strained, his delicate eyes filling with tears, "Is it wrong...is it...is it wrong to love another man?" O'Hara held his breath, waiting for Devine's reaction. His watery eyes shimmered, drawing light from his own soft blue color. He stared through the dark holes of the wooden screen, trying to discern Father Devine's face. But the old priest said nothing. In fact, he was completely immobile and speechless. There was no answer, because Father Devine didn't know any answer. Finally, Devine mustered a question in what he deemed an objective tone of voice.

"What man?" Somehow, Devine couldn't refrain from asking this question. It was a natural curiosity that he displayed in order to find out personal details. He couldn't help but judge, and he couldn't help but do it in a personal sense. It was linked to his aversion or favoritism towards certain family names. He tried to control these unjust sentiments, but at times he couldn't help being inclined to inquire. As it would happen, however, he would soon regret asking the question.

"Father Turner." answered O'Hara as valiantly as he could. Devine immediately regretted asking the question. The unexpected short lapse between the foreshadowing and the revelation caught him off-guard, and he suddenly fainted.

He awoke a few moments later with O'Hara at his side, holding the door open. Devine unconsciously recoiled from O'Hara's pale face, but then he relaxed and motioned for O'Hara to regain his seat at the other side of the screen. As the man silently made his way round, Devine tapped his foot nervously and uncomfortably. He bit his lip worriedly. He scratched his snow-topped head in vigor. He wrung his hands feverishly. He swallowed saliva, attempting to alleviate his throat, which was surprisingly dry. He wasn't even going to ask how the situation emerged. It might not even be true, but would the man have reason to lie?

Why did things have a tendency to amass, making things much more critical than they should be? Dawn hadn't sprung, cheerful, from behind the mountains like an energetic schoolgirl, and already Devine had heard two confessions that set everything on edge. In vulgar terms, he was holding two of the three men most averse to him by the gonads, if he chose to exploit the advantage. Devine shook the image from his head. He tried to focus away from the fantasies of power and cruelty. He had to be true to God. In the first place, he'd scholarly sputtered some discourse about sin and love, and now he was made to look the fool by O'Hara's plea for clemency. What should he respond- should he condemn homosexual relations? Why or why not? Secondly, what was he going to do about Jeannie and Andy, and O'Hara and Turner? Should he expose confessions? He certainly had a lot of power, but would he let it corrupt him?

You wanted dirt on Turner? Well, I had this planned anyway...[/img]
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Kalanna Rai



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 3075
Location: The Frozen North

Posted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 9:06 pm    Post subject:  

Well at least it wasn't an alter boy...

If Father Divine is worried about being corrupted by power I think he needs to weigh a few things very carefully in the balance. Chief amoung them is a man's life. He's willing to sacrifice his own priesthood to save the man, because the Bishop isn't happy with him at all, but is he willing to risk corruption?

I think Devine needs a good session in the confession box himself. The question is...who will listen to his confession? He needs advice and if he's not getting it from god he needs to get it from someone he trusts...

Nice chapter D. I suppose you already know the old Catholic views on this chapter's 'peticular' subject though so I won't toss suggestions out that way. Once again...you've suckered me into wanting more.
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Chinaren



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
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Posted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 10:17 pm    Post subject:  

Good chapter D.

Though I do find some of your descriptions a little... strange:

Quote: The knockings grew null

Are you redefining words again here? ;) Do you mean louder? :?

Quote: The knocks sounded again, like pale ghosts moaning throughout the church halls

I dunno. Knocks and moaning aren't really similar. This doesn't work for me.

Quote: He stepped out into the hallway with his oil lamp and felt the coldness around him

This too, seems arkward.

Your first half is his journey to answer the door. I can see what you are trying to do here, to get an atmosphere of the trip, but some of the phrases seem a little oddly put. EG:

Quote: Reaching the door to the garden, Devine turned the knob lingeringly, dreading the darkness. He abruptly let go, as the door swung open against the wall and a sudden lightning crashed, disturbing the calm night. He stepped back in shock before peering outside again. Recovering from the unexpected noise of thunder, he paced outside.

I don't think lingeringly is a really suitable word for turning a doornob! Perhaps you could work it a different way:

The doornob groaned as he slowly turned it.. or something better than that.

This sentence seems very disjointed. First, you have missed a ly off suddenly. secondly lightening doesn't really crash. 'Crack' maybe.

Also you start with 'He abruptly let go' where it may be better if you put this after the lightning.

I don't think you need to add the thunder here.

Paced seems to be a bit abrupt, bearing in mind the slower pace of the mood at this point. Crept, or sidled? mmm, dunno.

Quote: another pair of knocks echoed softly everywhere, panting and gasping quietly like Devine.

Pair of knocks eh? It summons an interesting image it does, with angry knocks roaming the place in small groups of two. Perhaps couple would be better.

Again, panting and gasping hardly seems appropriate for the sound of knocking.

Quote: "What the hell do you want?" Devine said angrily, angry at his own foolishness, angry at mistaking a coward for an evil predator. Thunder crashed again, and a shower of rain poured down from the skies.

I like this one though. :D

DP:

Well, for the other two, if he is a man of god, as he supposes himself to be, then the confessions must remain confidential.

As for the other one, I don't know what your little religion says about homosexuality. It strikes me as just another one of religions hypocrosies that 'love all others' doesn't count in this situation.

Still, he is a priest, so no doubt he must follow his beliefs, otherwise change religion or something. :? :D

So, straight to hell with this foul creature who dares love wrongly. :shock:
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Lilith



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Posted: Sat Apr 07, 2007 2:03 pm    Post subject:  

Shocking... :shock: Hmm... quite a pickle D. If Devine was a true religious man, he would do whatever his religon tells him is right.... and continue to follow the path he chose. aka follow his religion, not someone else's interpretation of his religion.. :) Nice work!
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D-Lotus



Joined: 21 Oct 2004
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Posted: Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:29 pm    Post subject:  

Wow, China, thanks for the constructive criticism. I would have to say, however, that some of the things you pointed out are referred to as 'poetic language'. Knocks can't pant or gasp, of course, but the language only achieves to personify abstract objects.

However, you are right about many things, which I will take time to correct. Null means nothing, but the sentence is awkward, which has been proven by your confusion. I think it is possible to turn a knob lingeringly (I often do it when I'm lazy). There's no -ly missing from sudden, but the sentence could be rephrased. Anyway, I'll come back later and see what I can do to change certain things.

And no, I don't know the Catholic views about homosexuality. I heard that Catholics respect homosexuals, as long as they aren't sexually involved with other men (which is the main trait of homosexuality, so ?). I was actually hoping that someone could give Devine some sensible answers. I know this is a touchy subject, so your opinion will help me better formulate the next chapter.
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Kalanna Rai



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Posted: Sat Apr 07, 2007 10:23 pm    Post subject:  

Alright I'm not Catholic so this is all coming second hand. If I'm incorrect, feel free to correct me.

Last I heard the Catholic religion considered homosexuality to be aborrant. Also there are passages in the bible, I don't know which again this is second hand, that take a very severe view against homosexuality. I believe it was a stoning offense in Judea...

I personally could care less but then I'm not a priest. I think it might come down to Devine's personal views on the subject. That might just be what he bases his decision on.
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Crunchyfrog



Joined: 12 Dec 2006
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Posted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 12:30 pm    Post subject:  

This is also set in a time where homosexuality would not likely be tolerated in any way shape or form, so there is no doubt about the Catholic, or any church's views on it.

The man confesses his love for Turner, but it takes two to tango. There would be no easy way to prove Turner's feelings for O'Hara. So Devine only has suspicion.

I like the idea of Devine being in the other side of the confession box at some point. He needs to receive guidance on what to do with his knowledge. I do not know enough about confessions and whether or not there are situations where confidentiality cannot be maintained.

Hmmm... for the DP

I'm not a priest either but perhaps he can only convey the church's views on the subject and suggest some sort of appropriate penance for O'Hara to perform. Advise celibacy, perhaps?

Otherwise I think Devine should maintain his religious integrity. I think he should keep both confessions to himself.

Whether he still continues his investigations or not, the fact that he keeps them confidential may work in his favour later on, should he get into an even greater sticky situation with the Bishop.

Wonderful chapter, D, an excellent read.
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D-Lotus



Joined: 21 Oct 2004
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Posted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 8:49 pm    Post subject:  

Ok, here are the corrections I made.

Quote: He stepped out into the hallway with his oil lamp and immediately shuddered due to the coldness around him.

Quote: The knockings grew hushed and then inaudible,

Quote: Reaching the door to the garden, Devine turned the knob lingeringly, dreading the darkness. He released the door and it unexpectedly swung open against the wall as a sudden lightning bolt crashed, disturbing the calm night. He stepped back in shock before peering outside again. Recovering from the unexpected noise of thunder, he tread outside.

Quote: He peered around just as another combination of knocks echoed softly

Ok, and I need some more help about the DP. Devine needs to stay true to himself and to God. He just said that true sin is failing to love. So, is homosexuality really sinful?

And don't forget about Turner. A priest is bound to celibacy. But is O'Hara guilty for Turner's failure of compromise?

And is Devine's definition of sin wrong? If so, what should he add/take away.
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Kalanna Rai



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Posted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 9:10 pm    Post subject:  

Alright I'll take over the devil's advocate roll for Devine...

If failure to love is a sin you have to ask yourself the question is the relationship between O'Hara and Turner love or lust? Also Turner had taken a vow. It doesn't matter if O'Hara coerced him, tricked him, convinced him, or just plain offered...as you said it takes two. He had to be willing to break that vow in the first place.

As for Devine's defenition of sin, it could be wrong. Jesus preached unconditional love...yet he never had a wife, children, or even a lover. Thus you can make a strong point that physical love is not love at all, merely lust and the desire to continue the species. As I said, I'm playing the devils advocate. There are any number of flipside arguments to this.

For you DP I really think Devine needs to do some confessing himself...he needs to find a priest he trusts, preferrably not Turner or Dole, and get this off his chest.
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Crunchyfrog



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Posted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 11:34 pm    Post subject:  

Quote:

Ok, and I need some more help about the DP. Devine needs to stay true to himself and to God. He just said that true sin is failing to love. So, is homosexuality really sinful?

And don't forget about Turner. A priest is bound to celibacy. But is O'Hara guilty for Turner's failure of compromise?

And is Devine's definition of sin wrong? If so, what should he add/take away.

Hmmm, I cannot say much more than what I have already said, without doing extensive research about religious and secular views on homosexuality in the early 1900s. These views vary greatly through time and across cultures and religions, so... I have no idea what is right for Devine in the sense of being 'true to God' in the way that he has been taught, or his definition of sin.

As far as dealing with the confession, this has nothing to do with Turner's part in O'Hara's guilt, it is O'Hara he is counselling here. O'Hara has felt guilty enough to come to confession, and it has been a difficult thing for him to do.
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Mother Goose



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Posted: Wed Apr 11, 2007 8:59 am    Post subject:  

It's not clear to me that there has been any actual contact between O'Hara and Turner. O'Hara said he loved another man; maybe I'm naive, but to me that doesn't mean they had sex, or even that Turner knew about the situation.

Anyway, Devine can explain that love means wanting what is good for the beloved. It would be very bad for Turner to have a sexual affair, (both morally and in terms of his career), and the most moral thing for O'Hara to do is not to pursue this any further. He can also assure him that God loves him, that desires for forbidden things are not sinful in themselves, and that he will be helped in his efforts to lead a good life.

I don't see any reason to violate the seal of confession and I don't think Devine would do that.

By the way, the past tense of tread is trod.
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Mother Goose



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Posted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 5:28 am    Post subject:  

If there is a physical relationship going on, then Devine's advice to O'Hara should be the same as he gave Jeannie: break it off, but try not to be alone for a while, especially alone with Turner. Also emphasize that God has forgiven him in the sacrament of reconciliation. Perhaps give him a penance of some prayers, to help with the guilt feelings.

As for the seal, I still do not think Devine would break it. There is no way he can use this knowledge against Turner, however he may be tempted.

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D-Lotus



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Posted: Fri Apr 13, 2007 4:58 pm    Post subject:  

Hey, MotherGoose, that was an awesome reponse. I think you resolved all the doubts I had. That deserves some reward.

People, take inspiration from MG!
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Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 7:30 am    Post subject:  

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Chinaren
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Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:22 pm    Post subject:  

D-Lotus has sponsored a Bronze Reviewer award for Mother Goose, for great commenting.

The full sized award will be found in Chinren Hall of Heroes very soon.

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Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:36 pm    Post subject:  

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D-Lotus
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Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 6:57 pm    Post subject:  

Yeah, Zeph, always gotta have a hook. Right...? :-D

Well, I guess that post makes everything tidy. Poll out today or tomorrow (as fancy strikes).

Oh, btw. Mother goose, click here.
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Mother Goose
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Posted: Fri Apr 20, 2007 5:29 am    Post subject:  

Thank you so much! I'm overwhelmed.

Zephyr, after such a flattering invitation, I'll go check out your stories. I can't promise good responses though - sometimes I get ideas, sometimes not.
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D-Lotus
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Posted: Fri Apr 20, 2007 10:20 pm    Post subject:  

Sorry about my indolence! Well, the poll has been raised, in all it's mighty splendor!

I'd like to comment that the polls for this story are the hardest I have ever had to create. There are so many possibilities offered in your suggestions, that it's hard for me to concentrate them all into one effective poll. Therefore, I often ignore some topics and skip to the main concern. But your suggestions in other areas of the story don't go unheard, never fear. If I missed anybody's opinion in this poll, please inform me.

Well, happy voting! :D
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LordoftheNight
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Posted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 2:44 pm    Post subject:  

Sorry I took so long to reply D - I forget about the chapter.

From what I remember, homosexuality in itself isn't the sin, carrying through with it is. I know there's more than enough homosexual's in the ministry, the 'good' christians among them abstaining from sex.

I don't think he's got much against Turner from the sounds of it - having another man fall in love with you isn't really something you can avoid.
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D-Lotus
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Posted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 4:28 pm    Post subject:  

A four way tie?

Keep voting, please...
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D-Lotus
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Posted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 4:09 pm    Post subject:  

Ok, poll closed, perhaps prematurely, because of my fear that the small margin would be lost. :D
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Geek_girl72
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Location: Earth, The Universe

Posted: Tue May 01, 2007 12:35 pm    Post subject:  

Finally cuaght up with this, wow :shock: . I'm sorry I missed the comment and voting stage, things are really getting interesting. This story is trully gripping, can't wait to see what happens next!
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